Skip to main content

Review: The Girl in the Maze by R.K. Jackson



Blurb from Goodreads:
Perfect for fans of Gillian Flynn, Paula Hawkins, and Tana French, R. K. Jackson's lyrical, twisty psychological thriller debut follows an aspiring journalist as she uncovers dark truths in a seaswept Southern town—aided by a mysterious outcast and pursued by a ruthless killer.

When Martha Covington moves to Amberleen, Georgia, after her release from a psychiatric ward, she thinks her breakdown is behind her. A small town with a rich history, Amberleen feels like a fresh start. Taking a summer internship with the local historical society, Martha is tasked with gathering the stories of the Geechee residents of nearby Shell Heap Island, the descendants of slaves who have lived by their own traditions for the last three hundred years.

As Martha delves into her work, the voices she thought she left behind start whispering again, and she begins to doubt her recovery. When a grisly murder occurs, Martha finds herself at the center of a perfect storm—and she's the perfect suspect. Without a soul to vouch for her innocence or her sanity, Martha disappears into the wilderness, battling the pull of madness and struggling to piece together a supernatural puzzle of age-old resentments, broken promises, and cold-blooded murder. She finds an unexpected ally in a handsome young man fighting his own battles. With his help, Martha journeys through a terrifying labyrinth—to find the truth and clear her name, if she can survive to tell the tale. 
My Review:
 
The Girl in the Maze is not the best title for this book but it is about a girl, trapped only by her own mind.  The one thing that kept me from being fully immersed was the voices that Martha heard -- I wasn't sure what was related to her mental illness or her "gift" or even the supernatural nature of the town.  I wanted to believe her but something was so off when she had her episodes that I wasn't sure what was real.  The descriptions were good, however, and I got a true sense of the tiny coastal town in Georgia -- I wanted to travel to Shell Heap Island and meet the Geechee.

I would recommend this to anyone that likes thriller mysteries with a bit of supernatural -- I was definitely reminded of Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt while reading this one!  The Girl in the Maze was just released  today, September 8, 2015, and you can purchase HERE!  
Martha walked past a trio of brick archways, blocked with padlocked metalwork, some of it dented inward, and reached a peeling wooden door marked with the number sixteen.  Lady Albertha's.  no sign identified the place.  Next to the door was a window covered by wrought-iron bars.  Martha squinted into the dusty panes.  Discolored Venetian blinds hung lopsided in the window.  A cardboard sign on the will said:  Lady Albertha.  Advisor.  Readings, Root Work.

Comments

  1. I haven't heard of this one yet. This sounds pretty interesting and love the sound of the setting. Great review!!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Valentine’s Day Book Tag

I saw Grace @ Rebel Mommy Book Blog do this and it looked fun!  This tag was created by CC's books!
 Stand Alone Book You Love Dystopian Book You Love A Book That You Love But No One Else Talks About Favorite Book Couple Olivia and Caleb from The Opportunist Book That Other People Love But You Haven’t Gotten Around to Read  A Book With Red On The Cover
A Book With Pink On The Cover
You were given a box of chocolate. What fictional boyfriend would have given them to you?

What to Read if You Love The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

This & That – 2 Books with Strong Friendships, a Quest, and SHIPs!This and That” is a feature created by Megan @ Reading Books Likes a Bossand borrowed here with permission. Megan created this feature and I owe this post to her brilliance.  Not only should you check out her blog, generally, but her This & That recommendations are utterly perfect! Megan created this feature to showcase books that either sound similar or have similar themes, and thus I am recommending that you read the "that book" because you are a a fan of the “this book.” 
About the Books: THE RAVEN BOYS (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them--until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks to her.His name is Gansey, a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

Review: History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

Blurb from Goodreads:
Linda has an idiosyncratic home life: her parents live in abandoned commune cabins in northern Minnesota and are hanging on to the last vestiges of a faded counter-culture world. The kids at school call her 'Freak', or 'Commie'. She is an outsider in all things. Her understanding of the world comes from her observations at school, where her teacher is accused of possessing child pornography, and from watching the seemingly ordinary life of a family she babysits for. Yet while the accusation against the teacher is perhaps more innocent than it seemed at first, the ordinary family turns out to be more complicated. As Linda insinuates her way into the family's orbit, she realises they are hiding something. If she tells the truth, she will lose the normal family life she is beginning to enjoy with them; but if she doesn't, their son may die. Superbly-paced and beautifully written, HISTORY OF WOLVES is an extrao…