Skip to main content

Review: The Gunners by Rebecca Kauffman



Blurb from Goodreads:
Achieving bold emotional complexity, The Gunners explores just how much one moment, one decision, or one person can change us 

Following on her wonderfully received first novel, Another Place You’ve Never Been, called "mesmerizing," "powerful," and "gorgeous," by critics all over the country, Rebecca Kauffman returns with Mikey Callahan, a thirty-year-old who is suffering from the clouded vision of macular degeneration. He struggles to establish human connections—even his emotional life is a blur.

As the novel begins, he is reconnecting with "The Gunners," his group of childhood friends, after one of their members has committed suicide. Sally had distanced herself from all of them before ending her life, and she died harboring secrets about the group and its individuals. Mikey especially needs to confront dark secrets about his own past and his father. How much of this darkness accounts for the emotional stupor Mikey is suffering from as he reaches his maturity? And can The Gunners, prompted by Sally's death, find their way to a new day? The core of this adventure, made by Mikey, Alice, Lynn, Jimmy, and Sam, becomes a search for the core of truth, friendship, and forgiveness.

A quietly startling, beautiful book, The Gunners engages us with vividly unforgettable characters, and advances Rebecca Kauffman’s place as one of the most important young writers of her generation.
My Review:
 
Gosh, this was depressing.  Seriously depressing.  There wasn't a single bright note.  Not that being dark and depressing is bad but it certainly didn't help my opinion of this book.  I don't have too many qualms about the writing but I can't say this book was either enjoyable or transcendent. I was hoping this would be more like The Secret History, to which it was compared, but it wasn't.  It was unique and startling but I can't say I would ever read it again.

The Gunners comes out today, March 22, 2018, and you can purchase HERE.  
Alice, Lynn, Mikey and Sam listened to the music and didn't speak for a few minutes.  It was completely dark outside now, and darkish in the room, which was lit only by  a few hanging lamps that gave off a soft, golden light. Fresh snowfall was illuminated against the wall of windows. The fire on the far side of the room crackled and hissed. 

Comments

  1. Sheesh! I don't think I can handle all the sadness, this book obviously has. I would need at least one bright moment.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is new to me but...yikes, I don't think I want depressing right now but sometimes a good sad story is okay. Wonderful honest review!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

The Valentine’s Day Book Tag

I saw Grace @ Rebel Mommy Book Blog do this and it looked fun!  This tag was created by CC's books!
 Stand Alone Book You Love Dystopian Book You Love A Book That You Love But No One Else Talks About Favorite Book Couple Olivia and Caleb from The Opportunist Book That Other People Love But You Haven’t Gotten Around to Read  A Book With Red On The Cover
A Book With Pink On The Cover
You were given a box of chocolate. What fictional boyfriend would have given them to you?

What to Read if You Love The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater

This & That – 2 Books with Strong Friendships, a Quest, and SHIPs!This and That” is a feature created by Megan @ Reading Books Likes a Bossand borrowed here with permission. Megan created this feature and I owe this post to her brilliance.  Not only should you check out her blog, generally, but her This & That recommendations are utterly perfect! Megan created this feature to showcase books that either sound similar or have similar themes, and thus I am recommending that you read the "that book" because you are a a fan of the “this book.” 
About the Books: THE RAVEN BOYS (The Raven Cycle #1) by Maggie Stiefvater Every year, Blue Sargent stands next to her clairvoyant mother as the soon-to-be dead walk past. Blue never sees them--until this year, when a boy emerges from the dark and speaks to her.His name is Gansey, a rich student at Aglionby, the local private school. Blue has a policy of staying away from Aglionby boys. Known as Raven Boys, they can only mean trouble.

Review: History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

Blurb from Goodreads:
Linda has an idiosyncratic home life: her parents live in abandoned commune cabins in northern Minnesota and are hanging on to the last vestiges of a faded counter-culture world. The kids at school call her 'Freak', or 'Commie'. She is an outsider in all things. Her understanding of the world comes from her observations at school, where her teacher is accused of possessing child pornography, and from watching the seemingly ordinary life of a family she babysits for. Yet while the accusation against the teacher is perhaps more innocent than it seemed at first, the ordinary family turns out to be more complicated. As Linda insinuates her way into the family's orbit, she realises they are hiding something. If she tells the truth, she will lose the normal family life she is beginning to enjoy with them; but if she doesn't, their son may die. Superbly-paced and beautifully written, HISTORY OF WOLVES is an extrao…